Frank McCarty—Compositions

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Oboe Concerto (1990/93) [24:11]
neo-classical style

Oboe and Orchestra or Oboe and Piano

Publisher:
Soundlib Press

Recording:
McCarty: Classics

This Oboe Concerto is connected to Paris in the Roaring '20s. It is associated with the neo-classic styles of Stravinsky, Milhaud, Satie and Poulenc, and also includes a bit of musique Americaine.

Program Note:
OBOE CONCERTO by Frank McCarty (1990, 1993)
I. Retinue
II. Remembering Lenny
III. Side Show

Program Note
Unlike most composers, I do not possess a singular style or compositional technique. Each of my works presumes its own idiomatic context and premise. My craft, then, is learning to compose within different boundaries for each new piece.

This Oboe Concerto is connected to Paris in the Roaring '20s. It is associated with the neo-classic styles of Stravinsky, Milhaud, Satie and Poulenc, and also includes a good deal of musique Americaine. In it, I have attempted to avoid the hyper-serious qualities of Germanic angst and to stress elements of wit, the mundane, and musical surrealism. The work employs popularistic forms along with more traditional modes of expression. Furthermore, in the Mozartean sense, this concerto is an instrumental rendering of the operatic solo scena; it is laden with dramatic and virtuosic qualities and is clearly about its own performance. In structure, the first movement is a compound binary form with introduction and coda; the second movement is a chaconne; and the third, a rondo-pastiche.
The middle movement, in memory of Leonard Bernstein, commemorates one of my musical heros - clearly the most influential American musician ever. His prodigious talents as composer, pianist, conductor and educator are manifest. Even at the end of his life, he campaigned energetically against artistic repression in the United States and was able to make Beethoven's Ninth Symphony the theme song for the end of the Cold War.
I wish also to acknowledge two influential oboe players in my life: Carlos Mullenix, my chamber music coach in college - a member of the original Barrere Quintet and one of Toscanini's players; and Robert Bloom, who in my opinion is the world-champion phrase-turner of all time. My thanks go as well to (another oboe player) Peter Perret, conductor of the Winston-Salem Symphony, who offered the original commission in 1988, and has supported the difficult and complex task leading to this premiere. The Oboe Concerto is dedicated to my dear friend and fellow composer Russell Peck.